Teen Philanthropy Project

Teens explore philanthropy in a Jewish context. Coming together once a month, they learn all about the granting process. Participants will agree upon what type of project they would like to fund, research organizations that match their mission, send out RFP’s, read and review grant applications, meet with finalist organizations, and ultimately grant an organization funds. 

2013-2014

Teen Philanthropy2014Our teens granted WJCS (Westchester Jewish Community Services) $2000 for their “Off the Street” program.  “Off the Street” (OTS) is a dynamic after school program that takes place in Mt. Vernon. OTS meets an important community need by providing approximately 77 elementary school children who are both economically disadvantaged and at-risk of chronic school failure with access to high-quality after-school programming that supports their academic achievement.  Children receive tutoring and academic support, homework help, and participate in sports, arts, music and a host of other enrichment activities.

 

2014-2015

The mission of the Teen Philanthropy Experience at Temple Shaaray Tefila in 2014-2015 is to enhance the quality of life of people living in poverty. More specifically, we place an emphasis on supporting them to protect their environment and lead more sustainable, healthy lives. We have chosen to fund Bridges to Community’s Reforestation Project in Nicaragua with a $2000 grant. The project  will transform an abandoned 2-acre plot of land into a vegetable and fruit farm. Using the farm as a teaching model, 150 families who are living in severe poverty will be trained in the art of diversified agriculture, small scale irrigation, conservation, and small subsistence farming method and design.

“Through this program I learned about numerous local NGO’s and their mission.  In the end we donated to a local Jewish organization that will help give teens a fighting chance to thrive beyond their high school years.  I really enjoyed this fulfilling experience, and feel more knowledgeable as a result.” – Reed Feldman 12th Grader

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