Dear Friends,

We read in the Torah this week about the plague of darkness which was brought upon Egypt. But our sages tell us that it was a special form of darkness that effected not the eyes, but the heart. People were unable to “see” each other in the sense that they lost all capacity for kindness and compassion.We read in the Torah this week about the plague of darkness which was brought upon Egypt. But our sages tell us that it was a special form of darkness that effected not the eyes, but the heart. People were unable to “see” each other in the sense that they lost all capacity for kindness and compassion.

It was George Bernard Shaw who wrote that “the worst sin towards our fellow creatures is not to hate them, but to be indifferent to them. That is the essence of inhumanity.”

I consider those words and I can’t help but think of the debate in our society about the so-called DACA children. And I’ve been wondering:  how can some be so insensitive as to believe that it is in our national interest to send these young adults, who have grown up in our country, back to the countries from which their parents came? How can some be so emotionally blind to the feelings and fears of these young people who know only that their home is this country, and their way of life rooted in the ways and values of America. 

I know some of these people. They live in Mt. Kisco. They are hard-working, good people who want only to remain here and to pursue the so-called American Dream. Yes, it is only when we see the humanity in other people, that `we can preserve it within ourselves.

         Rabbi David Greenberg