Dear Friends,

All too often the compelling news story of one day seem to become “old news” within too short a time. I am thinking of the horrific terror attack which occurred in Egypt a little more than a week ago.  More than three-hundred people who came together to pray lost their lives in yet another vicious terror attack. I feel outrage  and compassion for the victims and their loved ones as I try to imagine the anguish that is now felt by so many people.All too often the compelling news story of one day seem to become “old news” within too short a time. I am thinking of the horrific terror attack which occurred in Egypt a little more than a week ago.  More than three-hundred people who came together to pray lost their lives in yet another vicious terror attack. I feel outrage  and compassion for the victims and their loved ones as I try to imagine the anguish that is now felt by so many people.
                  
The Bible tells us that God has made us “little lower than the angels” and given us great power.  With this power we can wage war on cancer and other devastating diseases. With this power we can fly from one place to another and put knowledge at our fingertips with speed unimaginable only a generation ago.
                
 But with this power, we can also build assault rifles and other instruments of death to wipe out lives, hopes and dreams in an instant. People sitting in a mosque (or a church or a synagogue), praying only for life and well-being: So how can it be that we dare speak of God in a world that knows so much cruelty and violence?  How can it be that good and innocent people come together to pray, only to lose their lives because of senseless hatred and moral blindness?
                
 The God in whom I believe made it possible for us to have free will. We can choose to use our abilities, however great or small they may be, for good or for evil. God implores us to choose good. But terrorists continue to choose evil. And so it is that good people, who truly represent God’s desire for humanity, must fight them in every way that we can. And even though it seems that the forces of evil and destruction grow stronger each day, we must never give up hope that we can yet make this a better and kinder world.
                  
Long ago our prophets envisioned a time when “they shall not hurt or destroy in all of God’s holy mountain.” That vision remains our own as each of us is called upon to bring goodness and kindness to our world, even as we continue to wage the battle against those who would murder and destroy. What a compelling ancient vision for our time: “And all shall sit under their vines and fig trees with none to make them afraid.”
                  
I hope you will join us tonight for our Friday Night Live service. Our coming together for Shabbat represents our protest against evil, and our affirmation that the good that is within humanity will yet prevail.

Shabbat Shalom,

         Rabbi David Greenberg