Dear Friends,

Imagine: Our congregation was responsible for preparing, delivering and serving some two-thousand meals for Thanksgiving to those who would otherwise go without.Imagine: Our congregation was responsible for preparing, delivering and serving some two-thousand meals for Thanksgiving to those who would otherwise go without.
 
The Torah makes a “big deal” out of Abraham sitting in his tent when three strangers pass by. He runs out to greet them to  welcome them into his tent. Immediately, he and his wife prepare a meal for these strangers. From this little episode, our tradition draws some important values and ideals. Concerns and care for the stranger, the worthiness of feeding those who are hungry, and the great personal reward of performing acts of loving-kindness.
 
From the children of our nursery school through the senior members of our congregation, we came together to perform such a worthy Mitzvah- a sacred act of kindness and sharing our own blessings.
 
Our tradition has long affirmed that “the reward for doing a Mitzvah lies in the doing itself” That is to say that we become more enriched with the more of ourselves that we give to others, and especially those who are in need.
 
Great thanks to Gary and Richard and all of you who helped make a vision a reality

Shabbat Shalom,

         Rabbi David Greenberg